prudence


prudence
prudence, providence, foresight, forethought, discretion are comparable when they denote a quality that enables a person to choose the wise and sensible course, especially in managing his practical affairs. The same differences in implications and connotations are apparent in the corresponding adjectives prudent, provident, foresighted, forethoughtful, discreet.
Prudence and prudent (see also WISE) the most comprehensive of these words, imply both that one does not act rashly or unadvisedly and that one has foreseen the probable consequences of one's act. Consequently the terms usually imply habitual caution and circumspection
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that type of person who is conservative from prudence but revolutionary in his dreams— T. S. Eliot

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prudence is a virtue that reviews all of the values at stake and then assigns to each its proper weight— JAMA

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had judged it more prudent to hide than to fight— Heiser

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Providence and provident imply thought for the future, especially with reference to its difficulties and its needs and, usually, the provision in advance of what will then be required
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the intellectual providence to acquire . . . vast stores of dry information— Bagehot

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a provident, rather thoughtful people, who made their livelihood secure by raising crops and fowl— Cather

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Foresight and foresighted stress a power, usually the result of a highly developed intelligence, of seeing what is likely to happen and of being prepared for it
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the more we study the making of the principate, the more we shall be impressed with the grasp and foresight of its founder— Buchan

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incapable of the foresighted control and adjustment of action which are the essence of all the higher forms of behavior— McDougall

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Forethought and the less frequent forethoughtful suggest due consideration of contingencies
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in choosing the Yankee dialect, I did not act without forethought—J. R. Lowell

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every newcomer, be he never so forethoughtful, finds himself lacking tools— Bell

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Discretion and discreet stress qualities (as good judgment, caution, and self-control) which make for prudence or compel prudent action; they often imply the power to restrain oneself when one is tempted to be temerarious, passionate, incensed, or loquacious
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Encountered an eagerness to talk and a candor of expression among officials that . . . has heavily taxed my discretion— A. E. Stevenson

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I dare say he will be a discreeter man all his life, for the foolishness of his first choice— A usten

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Analogous words: caution, circumspection, calculation (see under CAUTIOUS): expediency, advisableness (see corresponding adjectives at EXPEDIENT): frugality, thriftiness or thrift (see corresponding adjectives at SPARING)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:
(accompanied with forecast), , , , , , , , , , , (applied to the ordinary affairs of life)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • PRUDENCE — PRUDENCE, lat. AURELIUS PRUDENTIUS CLEMENS (348 env. env. 410) Né à Calagurris (Calahorra), en Espagne, il eut une brillante carrière juridique et politique; deux fois gouverneur de province en Espagne, il exerça de hautes fonctions à la cour de… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Prudence — (lat.:prudentia) is classically considered to be a virtue, and indeed, one of the Cardinal Virtues. The word comes from Old French prudence (13th century), from Latin prudentia foresight, sagacity, contraction of providentia foresight. It is… …   Wikipedia

  • Prudence — • One of the four cardinal virtues Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Prudence     Prudence     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • prudence — PRUDENCE. s. f. Vertu par laquelle on discerne ce qu il faut suivre, & ce qu il faut éviter dans la conduite de la vie. La prudence est une des quatre Vertus Cardinales. agir avec prudence. se conduire avec prudence. la prudence doit estre la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Prudence — Pru dence, n. [F., fr. L. prudentia, contr. from providentia. See {Prudent}, and cf. {Providence}.] The quality or state of being prudent; wisdom in the way of caution and provision; discretion; carefulness; hence, also, economy; frugality. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Prudence — war eine Rockband aus Namsos (Norwegen), welche aus Åge Aleksandersen, Terje Tysland, Johan Tangen, Kjell Ove Riseth, Kaare Skevik und Per Erik Wallum bestand. Frode Viken, später bekannt durch die Band D.D.E., war eine Zeit lang Bassist. Die… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • prudence — pru·dence / prüd əns/ n: attentiveness to possible hazard: caution or circumspection as to danger or risk a person of ordinary prudence Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. prudence …   Law dictionary

  • Prudence — f English: originally a medieval form of the Latin name Prūdentia, a feminine form of Prūdentius, from prūdens provident. The Blessed Prudentia was a 15th century abbess who founded a new convent at Como in Italy. Later, among the Puritans in… …   First names dictionary

  • prudence — mid 14c., wisdom to see what is virtuous, or what is suitable or profitable, from O.Fr. prudence (13c.), from L. prudentia foresight, sagacity, contraction of providentia foresight (see PROVIDENCE (Cf. providence)). Secondary sense of wisdom… …   Etymology dictionary

  • prudence — Prudence, quand quelqu un sçait que c est de bien et de mal, Prudentia. Tout ce qu il a de prudence, il l a apprinse par mes amours, Quicquid sapit, meo amore sapit …   Thresor de la langue françoyse


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